Is Understood Rude?

Did u understand or understood?

Both are perfectly correct..

one in present tense and the other in the past.

Do you understand if you are enquiring whether someone has just understood something.

Did you understand if you are referring to something which is in the past..

How do you say OK in polite way?

“Ok” is not considered formal. It can be used sometimes in formal conversations, but not in writing. Some words you can use in it’s place are “acceptable”, “all right”, or “decent”.

How do you say I know politely?

If you really want to say “I already know that”, just say so, or “ikr”, or “yeah, I know”. This may well be a matter of context. For general conversation, politeness may well call for you to just acknowledge the information you have been given, as there is “no loss” in acknowledging their knowledge.

What’s understood don’t need to be explained?

It simply means that if you understand something there is no need to have someone further explain it to you. Either it has been explained before or it was understood even without an explanation, so nobody needs to explain it.

What is another word for Understood?

Understood Synonyms – WordHippo Thesaurus….What is another word for understood?implicitassumedimpliedacceptedagreedinferredpresumedsilentunwrittenappreciated48 more rows

How do you say understood professionally?

Often the best way to indicate that you have understood is to summarize in one sentence what your understanding will lead you to do next. e.g., “I understand. I will get back to you with the revisions you requested by Monday.” “I see.

What can I say instead of I understand?

You can do that by saying:OK / Alright / Sure.Got it.OK, I get it now / That’s clear, thank you.Fair enough / I see where you’re coming from / I take your point / That makes sense.Of course / Absolutely.I appreciate why you think that, but…I hear what you’re saying, but…When You Understand Someone’s Feelings:More items…•

How do you respond to polite way?

That sounds great, thank you!Great Plan, looking forward do it!Okay that sounds great to me, let me know if anything changes in the mean time.Perfect! Thank you for your work on this!Okay that sounds great! See you then!Okay, that works for me. Thanks again!Okay, thank you for letting me know.Okay, I agree.More items…

Did not understood or understand?

Either is correct: “didn’t understand you” is in the past tense, and “don’t understand you” is in the present tense. … “Understood” is the past and past participle of understand, and would be used in sentences like “I hadn’t understood you”, or “It’s understood that 1+1 = 2”, or “He understood what I told him”.

Is fair enough rude?

It means you have a valid answer in an argument. It’s generally said when people accept they lost the argument due to your argument being “fair enough”. It’s neither rude nor dismissive. The person is communicating their agreement with the reason provided before they made their response.

What does it mean I see?

Also, I see what you mean. I understand, as in I see, you’d rather go running in the morning while it’s cool, or It’s too early to run an ad? I see what you mean. This idiom uses see in the sense of “perceive” or “comprehend,” a usage dating from 1300.

What does it mean when someone says Understood?

Understood means that you now know how to do something, or you know how something works. An example: Someone may say “can you fold your clothes like this instead in the future?”

Can I say understood?

Both understand and understood are grammatically correct. The one that you have to use depends on what you want to say.

Can you reply with understood?

Andygc said: You might be used to replying “understood”, but that is about as normal to English speakers as “got it”. There’s many ways of saying that you understand an explanation, but for most of us they begin “I …” – “I understand”, “I see”, ‘I’ve got that”, “I get it”, “I see what you mean” are examples.

How do you say I Seeally formally?

“I see.” is informal, and is often used by friends talking to each other. The original poster is correct that “I understand” is more formal than “I see”, and that both “I understand” and “I see” are often used by doctors who are listening to patients.